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Multidimensional living conditions index for Grenada identifies those most in need

New research published in the OPHI working paper series has proposed a multidimensional living conditions index for Grenada to identify the country’s most deprived households.

Researchers from the University of Essex, the Colombian Government and the University of Oxford constructed the Grenadian living conditions index (GLCI) to provide an effective targeting tool for poverty reduction policies, enabling resources to be focused on those most in need.

The GLCI prioritises quality of life and living conditions, rather than income or expenditure. Based on the Alkire Foster method and related methodologies, it provides a combined measure of 22 different indicators of poverty, which are grouped into seven dimensions:

  • demographic and health vulnerability;
  • childhood conditions;
  • household educational environment;
  • educative services access;
  • labour conditions;
  • resources at home; and
  • dwelling conditions and access to dwelling services.

To ensure that poverty reduction policies can be accurately targeted and measured, the proposed GLCI can be broken down to reveal how households are poor (which indicators they are deprived in) and the degree of deprivation they experience (how far they are from the determined poverty threshold), as well as showing changes in poverty over time.

The index can be tailored according to the focus and criteria of each social programme, for example, by enabling policymakers to change eligibility thresholds. It can also be compared to information on expenditure poverty to maximise precision in identifying which households are eligible for public assistance.

Read the full paper

Targeting Grenada’s Most Deprived Population: A Multidimensional Living Conditions Assessment’, by Yadira Diaz, Francisco Alejandro Espinoza, Yvonni Markaki and Lina Maria Sanchez-Cespedes, was published in the OPHI working paper series in March 2015.

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OPHI staff visit Ivory Coast to discuss multidimensional poverty measurement in Africa

OPHI researcher Bouba Housseini and co-founder John Hammock were in the Ivory Coast from 16-21 March where they gave presentations on the Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) at the African Development Bank and the UNDP Africa Economists Cluster Meeting.

The presentations were followed by discussion on the possible application of an MPI in Africa, and technical aspects of the measure.

An MPI would capture the different types of disadvantage that each poor person experiences at the same time – this could include, for example, poor sanitation, malnutrition, lack of education, poor quality of work, or violence. Countries can select different indicators and cut-offs of poverty according to their contexts, to create their own nationally-relevant MPIs.

As well as providing a headline measure of multidimensional poverty within a population, an MPI can be broken down to reveal how people are poor, where the poorest people live, and the intensity of the deprivations they experience.

During their stay in Abidjan, Bouba Housseini and John Hammock also attended the three day International Conference on the Emergence of Africa.

Further information

Read about local, national and international policy applications of the Alkire Foster method.

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OPHI research shows mixed results in multidimensional poverty reduction across India between 1999 and 2006

Multidimensional poverty reduction in India has not been equal for all regions, castes or religious groups, according to a paper by OPHI researchers published in the World Development journal.

Using data from the Indian National Family Health Survey in 1998-99 and 2005-06, the paper presents a multidimensional index of poverty (MPI) for India, which is strictly comparable across time.  The MPI includes ten different indicators of poverty – covering health, education and living standards – to reflect the multiple disadvantages that poor people can experience.

The index revealed that national multidimensional poverty fell overall in India between 1999 and 2006 by 1.2 percentage points per year, although the researchers note that the rate of reduction was much slower than in neighbouring countries such as Nepal and Bangladesh.

However, the reduction in multidimensional poverty was faster than the annual decrease in the percentage of the population living below India’s national income poverty line, which fell from 45.3 per cent in 1993 to 37.2 per cent in 2005.

The researchers also looked at the level of poverty reduction among different subgroups of the population. They found that the decrease was greatest among groups that already had lower levels of multidimensional poverty in 1999. This pattern contrasts with the change in income poverty across states between 1993-94 and 2004-05, where the poorest states reduced poverty at a faster rate.

Among castes and tribes, the reduction in multidimensional poverty was slowest for the poorest group, Scheduled Tribes. Similarly, across religious groups, Muslims, the poorest subgroup in 1999, saw the least reduction in the next seven years.

The fall in multidimensional poverty levels was also slower among those living in urban areas than rural areas. In 1999, 24.4 per cent of the urban population lived in multidimensional poverty, compared to 20.5 per cent in 2006. Among the rural population, the percentage of those living in multidimensional poverty fell from 68.6 per cent in 1999 to 60.8 per cent in 2006.

The paper additionally explores changes in the proportion of people who are intensely poor – defined as being deprived in more than half of the MPI’s ten indicators – and deeply poor – those who experience the severest levels of deprivation in a third or more of the indicators. The findings showed that, in 1999, 19.3 per cent of the Indian population were both deeply and intensely poor. Although this figure decreased by 2006, nationally 13.9 per cent of the population – over 140 million people – were still simultaneously intensely and deeply poor.

Read the full paper

Multidimensional Poverty Reduction in India between 1999 and 2006: Where and How?’, by Sabina Alkire and Suman Seth, was published online in the World Development journal in March 2015.

An earlier version of the paper was published in the OPHI working paper series in March 2013.

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Blog: Two months, two new policies, two parts of the world

In a new blog post, OPHI’s John Hammock looks at the new approach to measuring poverty recently adopted in Chile and Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

The blog discusses how leaders in both places have embraced the idea that poverty is more than just a lack of money – that poor people can experience multiple disadvantages at the same time, such as poor health and nutrition, no access to water or electricity, and a lack of education or employment.

It explores how the newly introduced poverty measure – the Multidimensional Poverty Index – reveals the different ways that people are poor in each place, enabling policymakers to target their resources and fight poverty more effectively.

John Hammock is Co-Founder and Director of Outreach at OPHI.

Read the full blog post

‘A tale of twos: Two months, two new policies, two parts of the world’ was published in Debating Development, a blog from the University of Oxford’s Department of International Development.

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Available now: Podcasts and presentations from OPHI lunchtime seminars

Podcasts and presentations from OPHI’s lunchtime series held in Michaelmas 2014-15 are now available to download on our website, via iTunes U and through the University of Oxford Podcast series.

The first term of the 2014-15 academic year saw OPHI hosting lectures and talks on different applications of multidimensional poverty measurement, and a well-attended special guest lecture on the politics of reform in the public sector by Michael Woolcock from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government.

The data presented in the seminars covered a wide range of countries and regions that included Chile, India, Peru, the EU-SILC, United Kingdom and sub-Saharan Africa. Topics varied from multidimensional poverty and ageing, inclusive growth, poverty and shame, inequality, growth elasticities and counting measures.

OPHI’s Lunchtime Seminar Series is held in each of the University of Oxford’s three terms. You can download the presentations and listen to the podcasts of weekly talks as they are made available on the website here.

The last seminar in this term’s series will take place on 9 March at 1pm in seminar room 3, Queen Elizabeth House, 3 Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3TB. OPHI Director Sabina Alkire will speak on ‘A Multidimensional Poverty Index in the Sustainable Development Goals – interim reflections’. Everyone is welcome, and a complimentary sandwich lunch is available on a first come, first served basis.

Further information

Find the podcasts and accompanying presentations of past and ongoing Lunchtime Seminar Series on the OPHI website.

Listen to the podcasts on iTunes U or the University of Oxford Podcasts series.

 

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Online now: Chapter ten of OPHI’s book on Multidimensional Poverty Measurement and Analysis

Chapter ten of OPHI’s forthcoming book, ‘Multidimensional Poverty Measurement and Analysis’, is now available to download as a working paper.

The book provides an in-depth account of multidimensional poverty comparison methodologies, with a particular focus on the Alkire Foster method. It is aimed at graduate students in quantitative social sciences, researchers of poverty measurement, and technical staff in governments and international agencies.

Chapter ten of the book presents a new measure of inequality among the poor. The same measure is then extended to analyse disparities across different population subgroups. The chapter also elaborates a measure of chronic multidimensional poverty.

‘Multidimensional Poverty Measurement & Analysis’, by Sabina Alkire, James Foster, Suman Seth, Maria Emma Santos, José  Manuel Roche and Paola Ballon, will be published in hardcopy in June 2015 and can be pre-ordered from Oxford University Press.

Read chapter ten

Chapter ten is available to download as OPHI working paper number 91: Multidimensional Poverty Measurement and Analysis: Chapter 10 -Some Regression Models for AF measures. It will also be published electronically on the book website, multidimensionalpoverty.org, in early 2015.

Further information

Chapters one – four have been electronically published on the book website, multidimensionalpoverty.org, and are also available to download as OPHI working papers.

Chapters five – nine are available to download as OPHI working papers and will be published electronically on multidimensionalpoverty.org in early 2015, along with related study and teaching resources.

Find out more about the book.

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OPHI and MPPN host UN side-event on multidimensional poverty measurement

IMG_8530OPHI and the Multidimensional Poverty Peer Network – a group of senior representatives from over 40 governments and international institutions – hosted a special side-event on multidimensional poverty measurement at the 46th session of the UN Statistical Commission on Monday 2 March 2015.

The side event, which was standing-room only, highlighted how multidimensional poverty measurement can help to ‘end poverty in all its forms everywhere’ – a key component of the first goal of the final Open Working Group proposal for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and of the Secretary General’s Synthesis report.

Featuring presentations by eminent panellists and discussion among all participants, the event demonstrated how national MPIs and an improved Global Multidimensional Poverty Index (the MPI 2015+), supported by a data revolution, can help to eradicate extreme poverty post-2015 as part of the core poverty indicators of the SDGs.

The MPI 2015+ complements income poverty measures and shines a high-resolution lens on poverty, showing who is poor and revealing the different types of disadvantage that each poor person experiences at the same time – for example, poor sanitation, malnutrition, unemployment or a lack of education – to ensure the SDGs ‘leave no-one behind’.

Multidimensional poverty measures have generated substantial interest and support in recent years. The governments of Mexico, Colombia, Bhutan, the Philippines, Chile and the state government of Minas Gerais (Brazil), and Ho Chi Minh City (Vietnam), use official multidimensional poverty measures, while many other governments are in the process of developing or exploring their use.

Presentations from the panellists at the event are available to download below:

Notes from the event

Notes from the event will be available here soon.

Further information

Read more about the Global MPI 2015+ in the SDGs.

Download OPHI’s 4-page briefing document: Multidimensional Poverty Index 2015+.

IMG_8567 IMG_8575 IMG_8552

 

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Now available: Chapter nine of OPHI’s book on Multidimensional Poverty Measurement and Analysis

Chapter nine of OPHI’s forthcoming book, ‘Multidimensional Poverty Measurement and Analysis’, is now available to download as a working paper.

The book provides an in-depth account of multidimensional poverty comparison methodologies, with a particular focus on the Alkire Foster method. It is aimed at graduate students in quantitative social sciences, researchers of poverty measurement, and technical staff in governments and international agencies.

Chapter nine of the book looks at how the methodological tool-kit for multidimensional poverty measurement presented in chapter five can be extended in order to understand inequality among the poor and changes in poverty over time.

‘Multidimensional Poverty Measurement & Analysis’, by Sabina Alkire, James Foster, Suman Seth, Maria Emma Santos, José  Manuel Roche and Paola Ballon, will be published in hardcopy in June 2015 and can be pre-ordered from Oxford University Press.

Read chapter nine

Chapter nine is available to download as OPHI working paper number 90: Multidimensional Poverty Measurement and Analysis: Chapter 9 – Distribution and Dynamics. It will also be published electronically on the book website, multidimensionalpoverty.org, in early 2015.

Further information

Chapters one – three of the book have been published online and are also available to download as an OPHI working paper.

Chapters four – eight are available to download as OPHI working papers and will be published electronically in early 2015.

Electronic versions of all chapters will be made available on multidimensionalpoverty.org ahead of hardcopy publication, along with related study and teaching resources.

Find out more about the book.

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Applications invited for OPHI’s annual summer school

OPHI is inviting applications for its annual Summer School on Multidimensional Poverty Analysis, which this year will be hosted at Georgetown University in Washington, DC, USA.

The course will take place from 3-15 August 2015. The purpose of this intensive summer school is to provide a thorough conceptual and technical introduction to some techniques of measuring multidimensional poverty, with a strong emphasis on the Alkire Foster method.

Deadlines

Applicants are warmly invited to apply by completing the online form. The closing date for applications is 23 March 2015, and participants will be informed of selection from 8 April. For applicants requiring financial assistance, the deadline is 16 March. Places for the Summer School are limited and competition is strong.

Further information

More details on the 2015 Summer School and the application process can be found here. You can see readings, presentations, exercises and other materials from last year’s Summer School here.

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Read online: Chapter eight of OPHI book on Multidimensional Poverty Measurement & Analysis available now

The eighth chapter of OPHI’s forthcoming book, ‘Multidimensional Poverty Measurement and Analysis’, is now available to download as a working paper.

The book provides an in-depth account of multidimensional poverty comparison methodologies, with a particular focus on the Alkire Foster method. It is aimed at graduate students in quantitative social sciences, researchers of poverty measurement, and technical staff in governments and international agencies.

Chapter eight of the book shows how to apply dominance and rank robustness tests to assess poverty comparisons as poverty cutoffs and other parameters changes. It presents ingredients of statistical inference, including standard errors, confidence intervals, and hypothesis tests. It also discusses how robustness and statistical inference tools can be used together to assert concrete policy conclusions. An appendix presents methods for computing standard errors, including the bootstrapped standard errors.

‘Multidimensional Poverty Measurement & Analysis’, by Sabina Alkire, James Foster, Suman Seth, Maria Emma Santos, José  Manuel Roche and Paola Ballon, will be published in hardcopy in June 2015 and can be pre-ordered from Oxford University Press.

Read chapter eight

Chapter eight is available to download as OPHI working paper number 89: Multidimensional Poverty Measurement and Analysis: Chapter 8 – Robustness Analysis and Statistical Inference. It will also be published electronically on the book website, multidimensionalpoverty.org, in early 2015.

Further information

Chapter one of the book has been published online and is also available to download as an OPHI working paper.

Chapters two – seven are available to download as OPHI working papers and will be published electronically in early 2015.

Electronic versions of all chapters will be made available on multidimensionalpoverty.org ahead of hardcopy publication, along with related study and teaching resources.

Find out more about the book.

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UNGA adopts resolution underlining the significance of multidimensional poverty measurement

In a resolution adopted in December 2014, the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) highlighted the need to reflect the multidimensional nature of poverty.

The 69th session of the UNGA adopted  a resolution on the 19 December 2014 on Operational activities for development of the United Nations system. The resolution underlined ‘the need to better reflect the multidimensional nature of development and poverty, as well as the importance of developing a common understanding among Member States and other stakeholders of that multidimensionality and reflecting it in the context of the post-2015 development agenda’. It invites Member States to consider developing complementary measurements, including methodologies and indicators for measuring human development, that better reflect the multidimensionality.

The resolution reinforces the proposal of OPHI and the Multidimensional Poverty Peer Network (MPPN) that the post-2015 development goals should include an integrated multidimensional poverty measure to draw attention to the bundles of deprivations poor people describe – and live. The recommended measure is a headline indicator of multidimensional poverty – the MPI2015+ (also known as the MPI 2.0), which would complement the $1.25 a day income poverty measure.

Further information

Read the UNGA resolution in full.

Find out about OPHI’s work on multidimensional poverty in the post-2015 process.

Read more on the UNGA website.

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Now available: Chapter seven of OPHI’s book on multidimensional poverty measurement and analysis

The seventh chapter of OPHI’s forthcoming book, ‘Multidimensional Poverty Measurement and Analysis’, is now available to download as a working paper.

The book provides an in-depth account of multidimensional poverty comparison methodologies, with a particular focus on the Alkire Foster method. It is aimed at graduate students in quantitative social sciences, researchers of poverty measurement, and technical staff in governments and international agencies.

Chapter seven of the book introduces empirical issues that are distinctive to counting-based multidimensional poverty methodologies. The chapter covers the different types of data sources used for multidimensional measures: censuses, administrative records, and household surveys – as well as outstanding data needs. It also discusses distinctive issues to be considered when constructing the indicators to include in a multidimensional poverty measure. Finally the chapter presents some basic descriptive analytical tools that can prove helpful in exploring the relationships between different indicators, detecting redundancy, and informing measure design and analysis.

‘Multidimensional Poverty Measurement & Analysis’, by Sabina Alkire, James Foster, Suman Seth, Maria Emma Santos, José  Manuel Roche and Paola Ballon, will be published in hardcopy in June 2015 and can be pre-ordered from Oxford University Press.

Read chapter seven

Chapter seven is available to download as OPHI working paper number 88: Multidimensional Poverty Measurement and Analysis: Chapter 7 – Data and Analysis. It will also be published electronically on the book website, multidimensionalpoverty.org, in early 2015.

Further information

Chapter one of the book has been published online and is also available to download as an OPHI working paper.

Chapters two – six are available to download as OPHI working papers and will be published electronically in early 2015.

Electronic versions of all chapters will be made available on multidimensionalpoverty.org ahead of hardcopy publication, along with related study and teaching resources.

Find out more about the book.

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Online now: Chapter six of OPHI’s book on multidimensional poverty measurement and analysis

Chapter six  of OPHI’s forthcoming book, ‘Multidimensional Poverty Measurement and Analysis’, is now available to download as a working paper.

The book provides an in-depth account of multidimensional poverty comparison methodologies, with a particular focus on the Alkire Foster method. It is aimed at graduate students in quantitative social sciences, researchers of poverty measurement, and technical staff in governments and international agencies.

The sixth chapter of the book describes the normative choices made in the design of a multidimensional poverty measure. It clarifies the implications of each choice, illustrates interconnections between them, and outlines alternative ways that these choices might be understood, made, and justified.

‘Multidimensional Poverty Measurement & Analysis’, by Sabina Alkire, James Foster, Suman Seth, Maria Emma Santos, José  Manuel Roche and Paola Ballon, will be published in hardcopy in June 2015 and can be pre-ordered from Oxford University Press.

Read chapter six

Chapter six is available to download as OPHI working paper number 87: Multidimensional Poverty Measurement and Analysis: Chapter 6 – Normative Choices in Measurement Design. It will also be published electronically on the book website, multidimensionalpoverty.org, in early 2015.

Further information

Chapter one of the book has been published online and is also available to download as an OPHI working paper.

Chapters two – five are available to download as OPHI working papers and will be published electronically in early 2015.

Electronic versions of all chapters will be made available on multidimensionalpoverty.org ahead of hardcopy publication, along with related study and teaching resources.

Find out more about the book.

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Main findings from OPHI working paper included in report on poverty and inequality in Latin America

Findings from ‘A Multidimensional Poverty Index for Latin America’ – published as an OPHI working paper – have been included in the first chapter of ‘Social Panorama of Latin America 2014’, a report released by the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) last week.

Chapter one of the report explores achievements and challenges in fighting poverty in Latin America, presenting an analysis of both income and multidimensional poverty. It sets out the working paper’s findings from a multidimensional index of poverty (MPI) for 17 Latin American countries, which was calculated jointly by ECLAC and OPHI.

The MPI for Latin America is composed of thirteen indicators of poverty grouped into five dimensions: housing, basic services, living standards, education, and employment and social protection. Results from the MPI revealed that that approximately 28 per cent of the region’s population was living in multidimensional poverty, with highest levels in Nicaragua, Honduras and Guatemala, and lowest levels in Chile, Argentina, and Uruguay.

The report emphasises that poverty manifests in multiple dimensions, beyond income. It highlights that the MPI shows variation in the form and intensity of poverty between counties – a finding that it recommends must be taken into account for effective policymaking to combat poverty.

Further information

Social Panorama of Latin America 2014 was published by the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) in January 2015.

A Multidimensional Poverty Index for Latin America’, by Maria Emma Santos, Pablo Villatoro, Xavier Mancero and Pascual Gerstenfeld was published in the OPHI working paper series in January 2015.

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Read online: Chapter five of OPHI’s book on multidimensional poverty measurement now available

The fifth chapter of OPHI’s forthcoming book, ‘Multidimensional Poverty Measurement and Analysis’, is now available to download as a working paper.

The book provides an in-depth account of multidimensional poverty comparison methodologies, with a particular focus on the Alkire Foster method. It is aimed at graduate students in quantitative social sciences, researchers of poverty measurement, and technical staff in governments and international agencies.

Chapter five of the book gives a systematic overview of the Alkire-Foster multidimensional measurement methodology, with an emphasis on the Adjusted Headcount Ratio.

‘Multidimensional Poverty Measurement & Analysis’, by Sabina Alkire, James Foster, Suman Seth, Maria Emma Santos, José  Manuel Roche and Paola Ballon, will be published in hardcopy in June 2015 and can be pre-ordered from Oxford University Press.

Read chapter five

Chapter five is available to download as OPHI working paper number 86: Multidimensional Poverty Measurement and Analysis: Chapter 5 – The Alkire-Foster Counting Methodology. It will also be published electronically on the book website, multidimensionalpoverty.org, in early 2015.

Further information

Chapter one of the book has been published online and is also available to download as an OPHI working paper.

Chapters two – five are available to download as OPHI working papers and will be published electronically in early 2015.

Electronic versions of all chapters will be made available on multidimensionalpoverty.org ahead of hardcopy publication, along with related study and teaching resources.

Find out more about the book.

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New OPHI research shows overall poverty reduction in 16 Latin American countries

Uruguay, Argentina and Chile have the lowest rates of multidimensional poverty among 17 countries in the Latin American region, a new OPHI working paper has found.

The paper has proposed a Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) for the Latin American region,  composed of thirteen indicators grouped into five dimensions: housing, basic services, living standards, education, and employment and social protection. The authors estimated poverty for 17 countries at two points in time, one around 2005 and the other around 2012.

The findings show great variability of poverty across countries in the region. The researchers found that poverty is highest in three Central American countries – Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua – where 7 in 10 people are multidimensionally poor. In contrast, the proportion in Uruguay, Argentina and Chile is 1 in 10. Overall,  28% of people in the Latin American region are estimated to live in multidimensional poverty.

Encouragingly, there was a statistically significant reduction in poverty between 2005 and 2012 in all countries except for El Salvador, with decreases in both incidence and intensity of poverty. Among the components of the MPI, living standards, led by income deprivation, emerged as a significant contributor to overall poverty, accounting – on average – for 30% of total poverty.

Read the full paper

‘A Multidimensional Poverty Index for Latin America’, by Maria Emma Santos, Pablo Villatoro, Xavier Mancero and Pascual Gerstenfeld was published in the OPHI working paper series in January 2015.

The MPI for Latin America and the main findings of this paper have been included in Chapter 1 of the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean’s Social Panorama of Latin America 2014.

Find out more about OPHI’s Global Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) findings for countries in Latin America

Download individual country briefings for Latin American countries to see national and sub-national poverty profiles.

View graphs and maps for different poverty indicators at OPHI’s interactive databank.

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Chile announces national Multidimensional Poverty Index

The Chilean government announced its new national Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) on 24 January 2015.  The national MPI was announced at the same time as the government released its updated income poverty measure. The government’s presentation can be viewed online.

According to the MPI, 20.4 per cent of the population in Chile live in multidimensional poverty, while 14.4 per cent are income poor. Five and a half per cent of Chileans experience both multidimensional and income poverty.

The Chilean MPI covers a wide range of deprivations, including education, health, safety and employment, and uses data from the 2013 National Socioeconomic Survey (CASEN). Announcing the results, Minster for Social Development Maria Fernanda Villegas explained that the MPI is a modern and transparent measure, developed in response to a consensus that the traditional income measure did not reflect the true reality of poverty.

Press coverage of the announcement can be found at latercera.com and emol.com.

The MPI methodology for Chile was formally presented in December 2014 at a seminar organised by the Ministry for Social Development and the Centre for the Study of Conflict and Social Cohesion (COES).  This was the culmination of work that began with a consultation process for a new index during President Bachelet’s previous term in office. The intervening administration established a presidential commission that worked to develop a multidimensional measure, before the new government’s work in finalising (with OPHI technical assistance) and now publishing the Index – all an excellent indicator of the measure’s ability to survive political change.

Chile is a member of the Multidimensional Poverty Peer Network, a network of over 30 countries focused on multidimensional poverty measurement. Chile joins Mexico, Colombia, the Philippines and Bhutan as the fifth government to adopt officially a national MPI.  In addition, the State Government of Minas Gerais, Brazil, and the City Government of Ho Chi Minh City also use their locally adopted MPI.

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OPHI lunchtime seminar series: Hilary Term programme available online

OPHI’s programme of lunchtime seminars for Hilary Term starts on Monday 26 January. OPHI Research Officer Ana Vaz will speak on ‘Measuring women’s autonomy in Chad and its associations with breastfeeding practices’.

Throughout the series, OPHI researchers will present their work on multidimensionally poverty, with time for feedback and discussion after each presentation.  Additionally, Brian Nolan, Professor of Social Policy at the Department of Social Policy and Intervention and Director of the Employment, Equity and Growth Programme at the Institute for New Economic Thinking, will give a talk on ‘Inequality, growth and living standards in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)’ on 9 February. The series will end on 9 March with OPHI Director Sabina Alkire speaking on ‘A Multidimensional Poverty Index in the Sustainable Development Goals – interim reflections’.

All seminars will take place on Mondays from 1pm – 2pm in seminar room 3, Queen Elizabeth House, 3 Mansfield Road, Oxford, OX1 3TB. Everyone is welcome, and a complimentary sandwich lunch is available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Details of the full programme are available on OPHI’s seminar page.

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Chapter four of OPHI’s book on multidimensional poverty measurement published as working paper

The fourth chapter of OPHI’s forthcoming book, ‘Multidimensional Poverty Measurement and Analysis’, is now available to download as a working paper.

The book provides an in-depth account of multidimensional poverty measurement, with a particular focus on the Alkire Foster method. It is aimed at graduate students in quantitative social sciences, researchers of poverty measurement, and technical staff in governments and international agencies.

In chapter four, the authors review applications of counting approaches in the history of poverty measurement. A counting approach is one way to identify the poor in multidimensional poverty measurement, which entails the intuitive procedure of counting the number of dimensions in which people suffer deprivation. The chapter focuses on empirical studies since the late ‘70s, which developed relatively independently of each other in two regions. In Latin America, applications of the Unsatisfied Basic Needs Approach were widespread, often using census and survey data. European work drew on concepts of social exclusion and inclusion, and now includes national and European initiatives.

‘Multidimensional Poverty Measurement & Analysis’, by Sabina Alkire, James Foster, Suman Seth, Maria Emma Santos, José  Manuel Roche and Paola Ballon, will be published in hardcopy in June 2015 and can be pre-ordered from Oxford University Press.

Read chapter four

Chapter four is available to download as OPHI working paper number 85: ‘Multidimensional Poverty Measurement and Analysis: Chapter 4 – Counting Approaches: Definitions, Origins, and Implementations’. It will also be published electronically on the book website, multidimensionalpoverty.org, in early 2015.

Further information

Chapter one of the book has been published online and is also available to download as an OPHI working paper.

Chapters two and three are available to download as OPHI working papers and will be published electronically in early 2015.

Electronic versions of all chapters will be made available on multidimensionalpoverty.org ahead of hardcopy publication, along with related study and teaching resources.

Find out more about the book.

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Third chapter of OPHI book on multidimensional poverty measurement now available

The third  chapter of OPHI’s forthcoming book, ‘Multidimensional Poverty Measurement and Analysis’, is now available to download as a working paper.

The book provides an in-depth account of multidimensional poverty measurement, with a particular focus on the Alkire Foster method. It is aimed at graduate students in quantitative social sciences, researchers of poverty measurement, and technical staff in governments and international agencies.

Chapter three provides a constructive survey of the major existing methods for measuring multidimensional poverty, many of which have been motivated by the basic needs approach, the capability approach, and the social inclusion approach among others. The chapter reviews Dashboards, the composite indices approach, Venn diagrams, the dominance approach, statistical approaches, fuzzy sets, and the axiomatic approach used in the measurement of multidimensional poverty. After outlining the different methods, the chapter provides a critical evaluation of each by discussing their advantages and disadvantages as methodological tools.

‘Multidimensional Poverty Measurement & Analysis’, by Sabina Alkire, James Foster, Suman Seth, Maria Emma Santos, José  Manuel Roche and Paola Ballon, will be published in hardcopy in June 2015 and can be pre-ordered from Oxford University Press.

Read chapter three

Chapter three is available to download as an OPHI working paper and will be published electronically on the book website in January 2015.

Further information

Chapter one of the book has been published online and is also available to download as an OPHI working paper.

Chapter two is available to download as an OPHI working paper and will be published electronically in January 2015.

Electronic versions of all chapters will be made available on the book website ahead of hardcopy publication, along with related study and teaching resources.

Find out more about the book.

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